“S(t)able Island: The Beauty of the Free” is an inspiring documentary about the paradoxical beauty and ecological balance of Sable Island. The film primarily focuses on the mysterious wild horses that have called Sable home for hundreds of years.
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The dream for the project began in 2011, when the simple question was asked, “if you could do anything what would you do?” What seemed like only a fairy-tale dream quickly became Rae-Anne LaPlante’s reality. The film was funded through a 30-day Kickstarter campaign, and is made possible by the continual encouragement of its supporters.
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“Without the financial backing and ongoing encouragement from supporters, this documentary would not be in production. It is a true blessing to have so many people believe in this project.” – Rae-Anne LaPlante, Producer of “S(t)able Island”
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Footage for the documentary was shot during a week-long trip across British Columbia to Saskatchewan, and a three week adventure to Halifax and Sable Island, Nova Scotia. Shooting of the film ended in early September 2013. The documentary is currently in post-production, and is expected to be released to the public in 2014.
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The documentary’s visuals are breath-taking, but it is the passionate voices in the film that bring this production to life. The film includes various interviews from people of all different interests, education, and connect to the island. Some grew up with calling “Sable Island their second home”, while others simply live to study the diversity and complexity of the island’s wonders.
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Here’s a preview of the documentary:
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The documentary’s intent is to provide it’s audience with a better understanding and curiosity for Sable Island. Very few people will ever experience being on Sable’s shores, but with this film, we hope to virtually take you there. It is the producer’s belief that in order to preserve the beauty of Sable Island there needs to remain strict human visitation and increase education and awareness of the island to the public.
The documentary is called “S(t)able Island” as a play on words for Sable and “Stable”, a home for horses.